Housing costs

The proportion of the poorest fifth who spend more than a third of their income on housing costs has risen. Private renters are more likely to spend more than a third of their income on housing.

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Link to source: Households Below Average Income

The proportion of people in the poorest fifth of the working-age population of the UK who spend more than a third of their income (including Housing Benefit) on housing costs has risen from 39% in 1994/95 to 47% in 2015/16. The proportion has been consistently lowest in Northern Ireland and highest in England. Wales began with a higher proportion with high housing costs than Scotland. However, since 2000/01, the proportion in Scotland has been higher than in Wales.

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Link to source: Households Below Average Income

People in the private rented sector are more likely to spend more than a third of their income on housing than those in any other sector. However, since 2010/11 there has been a rise in the proportion of those in the social rented sector spending this proportion of their income. This is due to the introduction in 2010/11 of affordable rent in England which allowed social landlords to charge up to 80% of market rent for new tenancies; far more than was the case for most social rents previously. There has also been a fall in the (already low) proportion of people with a mortgage spending more than a third of their income on housing.