Low income and deprivation

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The charts show that areas with higher proportions of the population experiencing low-income deprivation are also areas with higher proportions experiencing employment, education, health or crime deprivation.

  • In England, there is less of a gradient in the living environment and especially the housing domain. The housing domain here is very broad, based on indicators of distance to services, housing affordability, as well as overcrowding and homelessness, while the living environment includes housing conditions as well as air quality and traffic accident indicators.
  • In Scotland, with the exception of the access domain, areas with higher proportions of the population experiencing low-income deprivation are also areas with higher proportions experiencing other forms of deprivation.
  • In Wales, for four of the other domains (employment, education, health and community safety) there is a clear relationship between being in a low-income area and being in areas with worse other outcomes. Areas with worse housing and physical environment domain outcomes are more evenly spread across the income domain deciles, while access to services is worse in higher income areas, perhaps reflecting such areas being more likely to be rural, while areas of low income are more likely to be urban.
  • In Northern Ireland, for five of the six domains (employment, lived environment, crime, education and health), there is a clear relationship between being in a low-income area and being in areas with worse other outcomes. Areas with worse access to services domain outcomes are more evenly spread across the income domain deciles, again reflecting that access to services can also be limited in richer rural areas.

The data presented here is from our 2022 UK Poverty report, setting out the trends and impacts of poverty across the UK. Read the full report at UK Poverty 2022.